el mar hermoso

a photo and information blog about the ocean. from a girl who once dreamed of being a marine biologist and still gets excited about that vast and unknown world.

Turritopsis nutricul
aka the Immortal Jellyfish 

Turritopsis nutricul

aka the Immortal Jellyfish 

Turritopsis nutricul
Once it reaches sexual maturity, Turritopsis looks like a tiny, transparent, many-tentacled parachute (only about 5mm in diameter) that floats freely in warm ocean waters. But when times get tough, Turritopsis can turn into a blob, anchor itself to a surface, and undergo a sort of reverse methamorphosis back to its youthful form as a stalk-like polyp. That’s like a butterfly turning back into a caterpillar. Scientists, who first described this phenomenon [pdf] in the 1990s, believe Turritopsis can repeat its life cycle indefinitely.The trick to Turritopsis‘ infinite do-overs is a process called transdifferentiation, which turns one type of cell into another. While other animals can undergo limited transdifferentiation to regenerate organs (salamandars can regrow limbs, for example), Turritopsi is the only one that can regenerate its entire body.
Not surprisingly, the immortal Turritopsi are spreading. Native to the Caribbean oceans, Turritopsi have now been identified in waters near Spain, Italy, Japan, and the Atlantic side of Panama. Even though specimens from different locations have different numbers of tentacles (from 8 to 24), genetic tests confirm that they are of the same species. Researchers believe the creatures are criss-crossing the oceans by hitchhiking in the ballast tanks of large ships.

Turritopsis nutricul

Once it reaches sexual maturity, Turritopsis looks like a tiny, transparent, many-tentacled parachute (only about 5mm in diameter) that floats freely in warm ocean waters. But when times get tough, Turritopsis can turn into a blob, anchor itself to a surface, and undergo a sort of reverse methamorphosis back to its youthful form as a stalk-like polyp. That’s like a butterfly turning back into a caterpillar. Scientists, who first described this phenomenon [pdf] in the 1990s, believe Turritopsis can repeat its life cycle indefinitely.

The trick to Turritopsis‘ infinite do-overs is a process called transdifferentiation, which turns one type of cell into another. While other animals can undergo limited transdifferentiation to regenerate organs (salamandars can regrow limbs, for example), Turritopsi is the only one that can regenerate its entire body.

Not surprisingly, the immortal Turritopsi are spreading. Native to the Caribbean oceans, Turritopsi have now been identified in waters near Spain, Italy, Japan, and the Atlantic side of Panama. Even though specimens from different locations have different numbers of tentacles (from 8 to 24), genetic tests confirm that they are of the same species. Researchers believe the creatures are criss-crossing the oceans by hitchhiking in the ballast tanks of large ships.

livingsea:

Tomato Clownfish (Amphiprion Frenatus)
Among the clownfish, it’s the male that cares for the eggs. In some species of clownfish, the male cares for the young until they reach sexual maturity. Then they leave home to find their own anemone. 
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livingsea:

Tomato Clownfish (Amphiprion Frenatus)

Among the clownfish, it’s the male that cares for the eggs. In some species of clownfish, the male cares for the young until they reach sexual maturity. Then they leave home to find their own anemone. 

Crab
 
Crabs teeth are in their stomachs
The Japanese Spider Crab is the oldest crab of the world and is also believed to be the most deep-living crab as well as the one with the longest lifespan. It has a walking leg span of 3 to 4 m, which can go to 8 m when outstretched.
8. 1 million tons of crabs are eaten annually in restaurants and homes all over the world

Crab

  • Crabs teeth are in their stomachs
  • The Japanese Spider Crab is the oldest crab of the world and is also believed to be the most deep-living crab as well as the one with the longest lifespan. It has a walking leg span of 3 to 4 m, which can go to 8 m when outstretched.
  • 8. 1 million tons of crabs are eaten annually in restaurants and homes all over the world
Octopus
 
Octopus has three hearts and its blood is light blue.
An adult octopus can squeeze through a hole the size of a 10-cent coin.
Octopuses are completely deaf.
An octopus can detach itself from its arm and to escape from predators and can later regrow the limb, with no lasting ill effects.
The blue-ringed octopus, merely the size of a golf ball, is one of the most poisonous animals on earth!

Octopus

  • Octopus has three hearts and its blood is light blue.
  • An adult octopus can squeeze through a hole the size of a 10-cent coin.
  • Octopuses are completely deaf.
  • An octopus can detach itself from its arm and to escape from predators and can later regrow the limb, with no lasting ill effects.
  • The blue-ringed octopus, merely the size of a golf ball, is one of the most poisonous animals on earth!
Pregnant seahorse
 
Seahorses are the only animals in the entire animal kingdom in which the male, not the female gives birth and cares for their young! The female seahorse deposits the eggs into the male’s small pouch like a kangaroo where the eggs are fertilized and where the baby seahorses grow until it is time for them to be born.
Seahorses are monogamous and mate for life! Every morning, they come together with their partner, dance, change their color, twirl around with linked tails and then separate for the rest of the day.
While mating, seahorses utter musical sounds.
Sea horses have a voracious appetite and can they graze continually and consume 3,000 or more brine shrimp per day.

Pregnant seahorse

  • Seahorses are the only animals in the entire animal kingdom in which the male, not the female gives birth and cares for their young! The female seahorse deposits the eggs into the male’s small pouch like a kangaroo where the eggs are fertilized and where the baby seahorses grow until it is time for them to be born.
  • Seahorses are monogamous and mate for life! Every morning, they come together with their partner, dance, change their color, twirl around with linked tails and then separate for the rest of the day.
  • While mating, seahorses utter musical sounds.
  • Sea horses have a voracious appetite and can they graze continually and consume 3,000 or more brine shrimp per day.

(Source: at-anchor, via at-anchor)

Starfish

Starfish

(Source: )

Common Starfish
livingsea:

Common Starfish (Asterias Rubens)
The Common Starfish reaches maturity with one year but can live up to 5-10 years. One female produce up to 2,5 million eggs. 
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Common Starfish

livingsea:

Common Starfish (Asterias Rubens)

The Common Starfish reaches maturity with one year but can live up to 5-10 years. One female produce up to 2,5 million eggs. 

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